Thomas Hinsche

Growing up in the meadows between the rivers Mulde and Elbe, I learned early to appreciate the natural biotopes. Guided by my father and grandfather, I grew up in a family of ornithologists and was thus infected by the "fascination of nature".

The fun of being outside, experiencing, and respecting nature is one of the main reasons I get up early at 4 am or squat in one spot for hours at 10 degrees under zero. Before I even get to photographing animals, I've been observing them for days. That's the only way I can recognize their habits. That is a prerequisite of my work.

I took the step to nature photography in 2006 and since then I have been capturing my experiences in photos. With a lot of patience, respect, and gentleness towards the animals and the joy of observing them, I developed my enthusiasm for nature photography year after year.

More about Thomas Hinsche and his photography under the gallery pictures and on: www.naturfotografie-hinsche.de and Instagram.

I don't take pictures just to take pictures. I don't just snap away. In my opinion, the most beautiful and diverse motifs are to be found in nature. The world of nature photography is correspondingly diverse. When I am in nature, I get impressions that inspire and fascinate me. I use photography to make these impressions and experiences accessible to others, to point out to them the peculiarities in their surroundings, to arouse their attention, to stir up curiosity in them. For me these are very important things. In this context, I also understand my photography as active nature conservation (environmental protection).

Especially the bird world has always interested me very much. The native species were always in the foreground for me. However, because these species are very shy, over time I could not avoid the purchase of a large telephoto lens.

My equipment consists of Canon technology. And almost always the 500 mm telephoto lens is used. Mounted on a stable tripod, I can follow the birds in almost all their activities. But not only my equipment improved steadily, my passion for photography grew with time. I spend more and more time behind the camera, working to improve and refine my skills and my own style.

Almost daily forays through nature are a prerequisite for later good shots. A photo is only the result of often days of preparatory work. Unlike portrait photography with people, I can't direct the animals, but often have to wait a very long time until the main actors are in the right place or even show their faces. Six to eight hours of sitting in a confined space are not uncommon, and that just as at freezing temperatures as at 35 degrees in the summer. The birds show us how it's done.